Who invented the first actuarial tables?

James Dodson, the teacher at the Royal School of Mathematics (which taught mathematics and navigation for the Royal Navy) wrote his first lecture on insurance in 1756.He began by building a life chart based on London's mortality bills from 1728 (when the age of death began to be recorded) to 1750. Actuarial science provides data collection, measurement, estimation, forecasting and valuation tools to provide financial and assurance data for management to assess marketing opportunities and the nature of risks.

Who invented the first actuarial tables?

James Dodson, the teacher at the Royal School of Mathematics (which taught mathematics and navigation for the Royal Navy) wrote his first lecture on insurance in 1756.He began by building a life chart based on London's mortality bills from 1728 (when the age of death began to be recorded) to 1750. Actuarial science provides data collection, measurement, estimation, forecasting and valuation tools to provide financial and assurance data for management to assess marketing opportunities and the nature of risks. There is a growing tendency to recognize that actuarial skills can be applied to a variety of applications outside the traditional fields of insurance, pensions, etc. Actuaries recognized the potential of modern theory of financial economics to complement the actuarial science existing in the middle of the 20th century.

Actuarial science became a formal mathematical discipline in the late 17th century with the increase in demand for long-term insurance coverage, such as burial, life and annuity insurance. Taken together, they highlight the breadth of British actuarial thinking that has emerged over the past 300 years and which underpins contemporary actuarial theory and practice. Few actuarial debates have had the same intensity or longevity as the question of how to value the assets and liabilities of defined benefit pension funds. One of the most difficult parts of writing an article about the history of British actuarial thought is choosing what to write about and what not to write about.

Non-life actuaries followed in the footsteps of their life insurance colleagues during the 20th century. Science has undergone revolutionary changes since the 1980s due to the proliferation of high-speed computers and the union of stochastic actuarial models with modern financial theory. While its immediate direct impact on British actuarial practice was negligible, in retrospect, it can be considered as the starting point in the development of a more quantitatively and statistically sophisticated approach to actuarial science that has characterized it ever since. By the time of World War II, British actuaries had accumulated nearly two centuries of successful experience in estimating probabilities and applying them to fixing and reserving insurance premiums.

Canadian economist (son of a lifetime actuary of Scottish immigrants) Frederick Macaulay had defined the length of bail decades earlier, but this work wasn't largely discovered by economists and actuaries (including Redington) until later, and no one (including Macaulay) appreciated his management applications of risks until after the Redington article. Before 1970, risk theory had largely focused on general insurance risks (insofar as it focused on anything within the scope of British actuarial thinking at the time). Redactive Publishing Limited publishes The Actuary on behalf of the Institute and the Faculty of Actuaries. A notable example is the use in some states in the United States of actuarial models to establish criminal sentencing guidelines.

This trend of actuarial research also led directly to the end of the provision of maturity guarantees linked to investment funds in the United Kingdom in 1980, when a joint working group of the Institute and the Faculty recommended maintaining levels of capital similar to those proposed by Sidney Benjamin (almost 10). years earlier.

Vanessa Melone
Vanessa Melone

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